University of Oulu

Shaimaa M. Fouda, Fahad A. Al-Harbi, Soban Q. Khan, Jorma I. Virtanen, and Aune Raustia, β€œMissing Teeth and Prosthetic Treatment in Patients Treated at College of Dentistry, University of Dammam,” International Journal of Dentistry, vol. 2017, Article ID 7593540, 6 pages, 2017. doi:10.1155/2017/7593540

Missing teeth and prosthetic treatment in patients treated at College of Dentistry, University of Dammam

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Author: Fouda, Shaimaa1; Al Harbi, Fahad2; Khan, Soban3;
Organizations: 1Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, Dammam University
2Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam
3Department of Clinical Affairs, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam
4Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Department of Community Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu
5Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu
6Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Stomatognathic Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 1.2 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe201708318371
Language: English
Published: Hindawi, 2017
Publish Date: 2017-08-31
Description:

Abstract

The percentage of completely and partially edentulous patients and their prosthetic treatment at the Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences (SDS), College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, were investigated. Panoramic radiographs and medical records of adult patients (𝑛 = 479, mean age 45.9 years, and range 25–96 years) treated in 2011–2014 were examined. 6% of the patients were completely edentulous, 8% had single jaw edentulousness, and 74% were partially edentulous. Edentulousness was significantly correlated with age and the number of missing teeth was significantly higher among males (𝑝 < 0.026). Diabetes was significantly associated with complete edentulousness, single edentulous jaw (𝑝 value 0.015), and partial edentulousness (𝑝 value 0.023). Kennedy class III was the most frequent class of partial edentulousness in single and/or both jaws (𝑝 = 0.000). Patients having class I and/or class II were treated most often with removable partial dentures (RPD) (𝑝 = 0.000), while patients having class III were treated with fixed partial dentures (FPD). It was found that complete edentulousness increases in older age and the number of missing teeth was significantly higher among males. Kennedy class III was most common in both upper and lower jaw and was treated more often with FPD than with RPD.

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Series: International journal of dentistry
ISSN: 1687-8728
ISSN-E: 1687-8736
ISSN-L: 1687-8728
Article number: 7593540
DOI: 10.1155/2017/7593540
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1155/2017/7593540
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 313 Dentistry
Subjects:
Copyright information: Copyright Β© 2017 Shaimaa M. Fouda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/