University of Oulu

Immonen E.‐V., Dacke M, Heinze S, el Jundi B. Anatomical organization of the brain of a diurnal and a nocturnal dung beetle. J Comp Neurol. 2017;525:1879–1908. https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.24169.

Anatomical organization of the brain of a diurnal and a nocturnal dung beetle

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Author: Immonen, Esa‐Ville1,2; Dacke, Marie1; Heinze, Stanley1;
Organizations: 1Nano and Molecular Systems Research Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
2Lund Vision Group, Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 3.9 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe201804036300
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Publish Date: 2018-01-11
Description:

Abstract

To avoid the fierce competition for food, South African ball‐rolling dung beetles carve a piece of dung off a dung‐pile, shape it into a ball and roll it away along a straight line path. For this unidirectional exit from the busy dung pile, at night and day, the beetles use a wide repertoire of celestial compass cues. This robust and relatively easily measurable orientation behavior has made ball‐rolling dung beetles an attractive model organism for the study of the neuroethology behind insect orientation and sensory ecology. Although there is already some knowledge emerging concerning how celestial cues are processed in the dung beetle brain, little is known about its general neural layout. Mapping the neuropils of the dung beetle brain is thus a prerequisite to understand the neuronal network that underlies celestial compass orientation. Here, we describe and compare the brains of a day‐active and a night‐active dung beetle species based on immunostainings against synapsin and serotonin. We also provide 3D reconstructions for all brain areas and many of the fiber bundles in the brain of the day‐active dung beetle. Comparison of neuropil structures between the two dung beetle species revealed differences that reflect adaptations to different light conditions. Altogether, our results provide a reference framework for future studies on the neuroethology of insects in general and dung beetles in particular.

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Series: The journal of comparative neurology
ISSN: 0021-9967
ISSN-E: 1096-9861
ISSN-L: 0021-9967
Volume: 525
Issue: 8
Pages: 1879 - 1908
DOI: 10.1002/cne.24169
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1002/cne.24169
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3112 Neurosciences
221 Nanotechnology
Subjects:
Funding: This project was funded by Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation and the Swedish Research Council.
Dataset Reference: 3D reconstructions of the brain neuropils of S. lamarcki are available at the Insect Brain Database website (Species Identification Number: SIN-00006; https://www.insectbraindb.org/species/6/). A movie showing the grey image stack of the dung beetle’s central brain (S. lamarcki) with labelled neuropils can be found on the journal webpage as a Supporting Information Movie 1.
  https://www.insectbraindb.org/species/6/
Copyright information: © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Immonen E.‐V., Dacke M, Heinze S, el Jundi B. Anatomical organization of the brain of a diurnal and a nocturnal dung beetle. J Comp Neurol. 2017;525:1879–1908. https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.24169, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.24169. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.