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Kalantari et al. BMC Medical Genetics (2018) 19:146 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12881-018-0664-z

A complete linkage disequilibrium in a haplotype of three SNPs in Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO) gene was strongly associated with anthropometric indices after controlling for calorie intake and physical activity

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Author: Kalantari, Naser1; Keshavarz Mohammadi, Nastaran2; Izadi, Pantea3;
Organizations: 1Department of community nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2Department of public health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4Student Research Committee, Cancer Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5Natural Products and Medicinal Plants Research Center, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnurd, Iran
6Department of public health, School of Public Health, North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences, Bojnurd, Iran
7Cancer Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
8Research groups of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
9Health Promotion and Education Department, Ministry of health, Tehran, Iran
10Department of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University of medical sciences, Shiraz, Iran
11Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Human Genetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.5 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2018080933571
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2018
Publish Date: 2018-08-09
Description:

Abstract

Background: The underlying mechanism of the effect of FTO genotype on body mass index (BMI) and body composition is unknown. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of FTO gene polymorphisms with anthropometric indices in adolescent boys after adjustments for dietary intake and physical activity.

Methods: In this school-based study, we enrolled 123 male adolescents without extra weight and 110 male adolescents with body mass index (BMI) higher than + 1 Z-score. The DNA samples were genotyped for the FTO gene polymorphisms by DNA Sequencing. BMI and body composition were assessed using bioelectrical impedance analyzer scale. Association of the FTO polymorphisms with Weight, height, BMI, body fat percent and skeletal muscle percent were investigated. Data on potential confounders (calorie intake and physical activity) were collected through the use of pre-tested questionnaires.

Results: Adolescents with higher BMI and body fat percent and lower skeletal muscle percent were more likely to have a newly found haplotype of rs9930506, rs9930501 & rs9932754 (GGT) in the first intron of the FTO with complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) compared with those with the lower BMI (6.15;2.28–16.63), body fat percent (9.54;0.92–47.44) and higher skeletal muscle percent (9.26;1.85–46.38). This association was not changed after controlling for age. Additional adjustments for calorie intake and physical activity did not alter the association.

Conclusions: A haplotype in the first intron of the FTO gene had a strong association with obesity indices in adolescent boys after adjustments for calorie intake and physical activity. It’s suggested that the FTO genotype exert its effects on adolescents’ anthropometric indices as haplotype and through mechanisms other than changes in calorie intake and expenditure.

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Series: BMC medical genetics
ISSN: 1471-2350
ISSN-E: 1471-2350
ISSN-L: 1471-2350
Volume: 19
Article number: 146
DOI: 10.1186/s12881-018-0664-z
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1186/s12881-018-0664-z
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3111 Biomedicine
Subjects:
Funding: The study was funded by Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Education and Promotion, Department of Ministry of Health, Tehran, Iran (code 2842).
Copyright information: © The Author(s). 2018. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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