University of Oulu

Pirjo Koivusaari, Johanna Pohjanen, Piippa R Wäli, Saija H K Ahonen, Karita Saravesi, Anna Mari Markkola, Kaisa Haapala, Marko Suokas, Janne J Koskimäki, Mysore V Tejesvi, Anna Maria Pirttilä; Different endophyte communities colonize buds of sprouts compared with mature trees of mountain birch recovered from moth herbivory, Tree Physiology, Volume 38, Issue 9, 1 September 2018, Pages 1437–1444, https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpy012

Different endophyte communities colonize buds of sprouts compared with mature trees of mountain birch recovered from moth herbivory

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Author: Koivusaari, Pirjo1; Pohjanen, Johanna1; Wäli, Piippa R.1;
Organizations: 1Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland
2Chain Antimicrobials, Teknologiantie 2, FIN-90590 Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 1.1 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe201901232797
Language: English
Published: Oxford University Press, 2018
Publish Date: 2019-02-22
Description:

Abstract

Plant meristems were previously thought to be sterile. Today, meristem-associated shoot endophytes are mainly reported as contaminants from plant tissue cultures, the number of observed species being very low. However, the few strains characterized have the capacity for infecting host cells and affecting plant growth and development. Here we studied the communities of endophytic bacteria in the buds of mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii (N. I. Orlova) Hämet-Ahti) exposed to winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) herbivory, to identify differences between sprouts and branches of mature birch trees. Mountain birch of the high subarctic is cyclically exposed to winter moth and produces sprouts to generate new trees as a survival mechanism. The majority (54%) of operational taxonomic units belonged to Xanthomonadaceae and Pseudomonales of Proteobacteria. Most of the observed species were classified as Xanthomonas (28%). Sprout buds had the highest diversity, containing approximately three times more species, and significantly more (43%) Pseudomonas species than the mature trees (14%). Our results demonstrate that endophytic communities of buds are richer than previously thought. We suggest that the meristem-associated endophytes should be studied further for a possible role in sprouting and aiding regeneration of trees.

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Series: Tree physiology
ISSN: 1758-4469
ISSN-E: 1758-4469
ISSN-L: 1758-4469
Volume: 38
Issue: 9
Pages: 1437 - 1444
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpy012
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpy012
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
Subjects:
Copyright information: © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. This is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in Tree Physiology following peer review. The version of record Pirjo Koivusaari, Johanna Pohjanen, Piippa R Wäli, Saija H K Ahonen, Karita Saravesi, Anna Mari Markkola, Kaisa Haapala, Marko Suokas, Janne J Koskimäki, Mysore V Tejesvi, Anna Maria Pirttilä; Different endophyte communities colonize buds of sprouts compared with mature trees of mountain birch recovered from moth herbivory, Tree Physiology, Volume 38, Issue 9, 1 September 2018, Pages 1437–1444, is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpy012.