University of Oulu

Launonen A, Maikku M, Vuollo V, et al. 3D follow‐up study of facial asymmetry after developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthod Craniofac Res. 2018;21:146–152. https://doi.org/10.1111/ocr.12230

3D follow‐up study of facial asymmetry after developmental dysplasia of the hip

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Author: Launonen, A.1,2,3; Maikku, M.3,4,5,6; Vuollo, V.1,2,3;
Organizations: 1Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
2Department of Oral Development and Orthodontics, Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
3Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu, Finland
4Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
5Department of Pediatrics and Adolescence, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
6PEDEGO Research group, Oulu, Finland
7Department of Orthodontics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.5 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe201903057114
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Publish Date: 2019-07-04
Description:

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the change in facial asymmetry among subjects treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) from childhood to adolescence.

Setting and sample population: A total of 39 adolescents (26 females and 13 males), born and treated for DDH during 1997‐2001, participated in the first examination in 2007 (T1; at the age of 8.2) and in the follow‐up in 2016 (T2; at the age of 16.6).

Material and methods: In this longitudinal study, three‐dimensional (3D) images were taken using a 3DMD face system based on a stereophotogrammetric method. Facial asymmetry was determined as the average distance (mm) calculated between the original and superimposed mirrored face and the symmetry percentage (%) calculated as the face area where the distance between the original face and the mirrored surface does not exceed 0.5 mm.

Results: Results showed increased asymmetry from T1 to T2. The average distance increased for whole face (from 0.51 mm to 0.59 mm, P = .001), upper face (from 0.41 mm to 0.49 mm, P = .005), mid‐face (from 0.48 mm to 0.57, P = .002) and lower face (from 0.74 mm to 0.85 mm, P = .147). Facial symmetry percentage decreased for whole face from 61.23% to 55.38% (P = .011), for upper face from 69.27% to 62.24% (P = .005) and for mid‐face from 62.29% to 55.63% (P = .007) and for lower face from 43.37% to 42.19% (P = .66).

Conclusion: Facial asymmetry increases from childhood to adulthood in subjects treated for DDH. Orthodontic treatment does not eliminate this asymmetric facial growth.

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Series: Orthodontics & craniofacial research
ISSN: 1601-6335
ISSN-E: 1601-6343
ISSN-L: 1601-6335
Volume: 21
Issue: 3
Pages: 146 - 152
DOI: 10.1111/ocr.12230
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/ocr.12230
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 313 Dentistry
Subjects:
Funding: The research was supported by the Society of Finnish Female Dentists, the Foundation for Pediatric Research and the Alma and K. A. Snellman Foundation, Oulu, Finland.
Dataset Reference: Supporting information:
  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/action/downloadSupplement?doi=10.1111%2Focr.12230&file=ocr12230-sup-0001-SupInfo.docx
Copyright information: © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Launonen A, Maikku M, Vuollo V, et al. 3D follow‐up study of facial asymmetry after developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthod Craniofac Res. 2018;21:146–152, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/ocr.12230. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.