University of Oulu

Kangas, V., Carrillo, J., Debray, P., Kvist, L. (2018) Bottlenecks, remoteness and admixture shape genetic variation in island populations of Atlantic and Mediterranean common kestrels Falco tinnunculus. Journal of Avian Biology, 49 (10), e01768. doi:10.1111/jav.01768

Bottlenecks, remoteness and admixture shape genetic variation in island populations of Atlantic and Mediterranean common kestrels

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Author: Kangas, Veli‐Matti1,2; Carrillo, José3; Debray, Paul4;
Organizations: 1Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, POB 3000, FIN-90014 University of Oulu, Finland
2Finnish Wildlife Agency, Oulu Regional Office, Muhos, Finland
3Island Ecology and Biogeography Research Group, Dept of Botany, Ecology and Plant Physiology, Faculty of Sciences, Univ. of La Laguna, La Laguna, St Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
4Faculty 02 (Biology/Chemistry), Bremen Univ, Bremen, Germany
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: embargoed
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019040511225
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Publish Date: 2019-10-22
Description:

Abstract

We studied genetic diversity and differentiation in island and nearby continental populations of a bird of prey, the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus. We sampled 11 islands in the eastern North Atlantic (Madeira and Canary Islands) and western Mediterranean archipelagos (Balearic Islands) and two continental sites (Iberian Peninsula and north‐west Africa). We used microsatellite (9 loci, n = 470) and mitochondrial data (cytochrome b sequences, n = 244) and applied Bayesian clustering, multivariate frequentist statistics and coalescence analyses. We revealed two main genetic clusters; the first including populations from the Atlantic islands and the second comprising populations from the Balearic Islands, the Iberian Peninsula and north‐west Africa, with additional finer scale structuring. The highest levels of genetic variation were found in Iberian Peninsula, north‐west Africa and Lanzarote island. The lowest diversity was detected in La Palma, the most north‐westerly island of the Canary Islands. The lowest levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity were observed in Madeira and Gran Canaria and the highest in Menorca. We found evidence of decreasing genetic diversity with increasing severity of a past population bottleneck and, to some extent, with increasing geographic distance from the continent. The two Canary Island subspecies, F. t. dacotiae and F. t. canariensis, have diverged from each other to some degree and from the continental and Balearic conspecifics of F. t. tinnunculus. Samples from Madeira, representing F. t. canariensis, indicated affinities to both Canary Islands and Mediterranean clusters, depending on the marker and methods applied. Our results suggest stronger gene flow between close islands than between distant islands. The genetic structure of an endemic subspecies F. t. dacotiae in the easternmost Canary Islands is suggested to have an origin in a past hybridization between continental F. t. tinnunculus and insular F. t. canariensis.

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Series: Journal of avian biology
ISSN: 0908-8857
ISSN-E: 1600-048X
ISSN-L: 0908-8857
Volume: 49
Issue: 10
Pages: 1 - 13
Article number: e01768
DOI: 10.1111/jav.01768
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/jav.01768
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Subjects:
Funding: The study was funded by the Univ. of Oulu and by the family of JC.
Copyright information: © 2018 The Authors. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Kangas, V., Carrillo, J., Debray, P., Kvist, L. (2018) Bottlenecks, remoteness and admixture shape genetic variation in island populations of Atlantic and Mediterranean common kestrels Falco tinnunculus. Journal of Avian Biology, 49 (10), e01768, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jav.01768. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.