University of Oulu

Oura, P., Paananen, M., Niinimäki, J., Tammelin, T., Auvinen, J., Korpelainen, R., … Junno, J.-A. (2017). High-impact exercise in adulthood and vertebral dimensions in midlife - the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-017-1794-8

High-impact exercise in adulthood and vertebral dimensions in midlife : the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study

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Author: Oura, Petteri1,2,3; Paananen, Markus1,2; Niinimäki, Jaakko1,3;
Organizations: 1Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland
2Center for Life Course Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland
3Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland
4LIKES-Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Rautpohjankatu 8, 40700, Jyväskylä, Finland
5Department of Sports and Exercise Medicine, Oulu Deaconess Institute, Albertinkatu 18A, 90100, Oulu, Finland
6Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Kastelli Research Center, Aapistie 1, 90220, Oulu, Finland
7Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland
8Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 8000, 90014, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.6 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019091728449
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2017
Publish Date: 2019-09-17
Description:

Abstract

Background: Vertebral size and especially cross-sectional area (CSA) are independently associated with vertebral fracture risk. Previous studies have suggested that physical activity and especially high-impact exercise may affect vertebral strength. We aimed to investigate the association between high-impact exercise at 31 and 46 years of age and vertebral dimensions in midlife.

Methods: We used a subsample of 1023 individuals from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 study with records of self-reported sports participation from 31 and 46 years and MRI-derived data on vertebral dimensions from 46 years. Based on the sports participation data, we constructed three impact categories (high, mixed, low) that represented longitudinal high-impact exercise activity in adulthood. We used linear regression and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to analyse the association between high-impact exercise and vertebral CSA, with adjustments for vertebral height and body mass index.

Results: Participation in high-impact sports was associated with large vertebral CSA among women but not men. The women in the ‘mixed’ group had 36.8 (95% confidence interval 11.2–62.5) mm² larger CSA and the women in the ‘high’ group 43.2 (15.2–71.1) mm² larger CSA than the ‘low’ group.

Conclusions: We suggest that participation (≥ 1/week) in one or more high-impact sports in adulthood is associated with larger vertebral size, and thus increased vertebral strength, among middle-aged women.

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Series: BMC musculoskeletal disorders
ISSN: 1471-2474
ISSN-E: 1471-2474
ISSN-L: 1471-2474
Volume: 18
Article number: 433
DOI: 10.1186/s12891-017-1794-8
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1186/s12891-017-1794-8
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
3141 Health care science
315 Sport and fitness sciences
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
Subjects:
Funding: NFBC1966 received financial support from the Academy of Finland; Oulu University Hospital; University of Oulu; the Northern Finland Health Care Foundation; the Duodecim Foundation; the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture (grant number 86/626/2014); the European Regional Development Fund (grant number 539/2010 A31592).
Copyright information: © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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