University of Oulu

Liisanantti JH, Käkelä R, Raatiniemi LV, Ohtonen P, Hietanen S, Ala-Kokko TI. Has theincome of the residential area impact on theuse of intensive care? Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 2017 doi: 10.1111/aas.12933

Has the income of the residential area impact on the use of intensive care?

Saved in:
Author: Liisanantti, J. H.1,2; Käkelä, R.1,2; Raatiniemi, L. V.2,3;
Organizations: 1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Intensive Care Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
2Medical Research Center, Research group of Surgery, Anesthesiology and Intensive care, Oulu University, Oulu, Finland
3Centre of Pre-Hospital Emergency Care, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
4Division of Operative Care, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.2 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019100931974
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Publish Date: 2019-10-09
Description:

Abstract

Background: The socioeconomic factors have an impact on case mix and outcome in critical illness, but how these factors affect the use of intensive care is not studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in patients from residential areas with different annual incomes.

Methods: Single‐center, retrospective study in Northern Finland. All the non–trauma‐related emergency admissions from the hospital district area were included. The postal codes were used to categorize the residential areas according to each area’s annual median income: the low‐income area, €18,979 to €28,841 per year; the middle‐income area, €28,879 to €33,856 per year; and the high‐income area, €34,221 to €53,864 per year.

Results: A total of 735 non–trauma‐related admissions were included. The unemployment or retirement, psychiatric comorbidities and chronic alcohol abuse were common in this population. The highest incidence, 5.5 (4.6–6.7)/1000/year, was in population aged more than 65 years living in high‐income areas. In working‐aged population, the incidence was lowest in high‐income areas (1.5 (1.3–1.8/1000/year) compared to middle‐income areas (2.2 (1.9–2.6)/1000/year, P = 0.001) and low‐income areas (2.0 (1.7–2.4)/1000/, P = 0.009). Poisonings were more common in low‐income areas. There were no differences in outcome.

Conclusion: The incidence of ICU admission in working‐aged population was 25% higher in those areas where the annual median income was below the median annual income of €38,775 per inhabitant per year in Finland.

see all

Series: Acta anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
ISSN: 0001-5172
ISSN-E: 1399-6576
ISSN-L: 0001-5172
Volume: 61
Issue: 7
Pages: 804 - 812
DOI: 10.1111/aas.12933
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/aas.12933
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
Subjects:
Copyright information: © 2017 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Liisanantti JH, Käkelä R, Raatiniemi LV,Ohtonen P, Hietanen S, Ala-Kokko TI. Has theincome of the residential area impact on theuse of intensive care? Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 2017 doi: 10.1111/aas.12933, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/aas.12933. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.