University of Oulu

Jääskeläinen, T., Heinonen, S., Hämäläinen, E. et al. Impact of obesity on angiogenic and inflammatory markers in the Finnish Genetics of Pre-eclampsia Consortium (FINNPEC) cohort. Int J Obes 43, 1070–1081 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41366-018-0217-8

Impact of obesity on angiogenic and inflammatory markers in the Finnish Genetics of Pre-eclampsia Consortium (FINNPEC) cohort

Saved in:
Author: Jääskeläinen, Tiina1; Heinonen, Seppo2; Hämäläinen, Esa3,4;
Organizations: 1Medical and Clinical Genetics, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
2Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
3Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
4VITA Healthcare Services Ltd., Helsinki, Finland
5Eastern Finland Laboratory Centre, Kuopio, Finland
6Laboratory Division, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland
7Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
8Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
9Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.4 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019110636818
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2019
Publish Date: 2019-11-06
Description:

Abstract

Background: While several studies have demonstrated that obesity increases the risk of pre-eclampsia (PE), the mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. We assessed the association between maternal/paternal obesity and PE and hypothesized that maternal body mass index (BMI) would be associated with an adverse inflammatory and angiogenic profile. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and following serum angiogenic markers were determined: soluble endoglin (sEng), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and placental growth factor (PlGF).

Methods: Data on BMI were available from 1450 pregnant women with PE and 1065 without PE. Serum concentrations of hs-CRP and angiogenic markers were available from a subset at first and third trimesters.

Results: Prepregnancy BMI was higher in the PE group than in controls (mean ± SD) 25.3 ± 5.2 vs. 24.1 ± 4,4, p < 0.001, adjusted for parity, mother’s age, and smoking status before pregnancy. Increased hs-CRP concentrations were observed in both PE and non-PE women similarly according to BMI category. In women with PE, a higher BMI was associated with lower sFlt-1 and sEng concentrations throughout the pregnancy (p = 0.004, p = 0.008, respectively). There were no differences in PlGF in PE women according to BMI.

Conclusions: We confirmed increased pre-pregnancy BMI in women with PE. Enhanced inflammatory state was confirmed in all women with overweight/obesity. Partly paradoxically we observed that PE women with obesity had less disturbed levels of angiogenic markers than normal weight women with PE. This should be taken into account when angiogenic markers are used in PE prediction.

Acknowledgements

FINNPEC Members: Hannele Laivuori2,7,8,9 (2Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland, 7Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, 8Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland, 9Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland), Seppo Heinonen2 (2Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland), Eero Kajantie10,11,12 (10Chronic Disease Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland, 11Children’s Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, 12PEDEGO Research Unit, MRC Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland), Juha Kere13,14,15 (13Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, and Science for Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 14Molecular Neurology Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland, 15Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Helsinki, Finland), Katja Kivinen16 (16Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK), Anneli Pouta13,17 (13Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, and Science for Life Laboratory, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, 17Department of Government Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland)

see all

Series: International journal of obesity
ISSN: 0307-0565
ISSN-E: 1476-5497
ISSN-L: 0307-0565
Volume: 43
Issue: 5
Pages: 1070 - 1081
DOI: 10.1038/s41366-018-0217-8
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0217-8
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
Subjects:
Funding: Funding was received from the Competitive State Research Financing of the Expert Responsibility Area of Helsinki University Hospital, Jane and Aatos Erkko Foundation, Päivikki and Sakari Sohlberg Foundation, Academy of Finland (grants 121196, 134957, and 278941), Research Funds of the University of Helsinki, Finnish Medical Foundation, Finska Läkaresällskapet, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Foundation for Pediatric Research, Emil Aaltonen Foundation, and Sigrid Jusélius Foundation.
Copyright information: © 2018, Springer Nature. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in International Journal of Obesity. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-018-0217-8.