University of Oulu

Kuula, L. , Pesonen, A. , Heinonen, K. , Kajantie, E. , Eriksson, J. G., Andersson, S. , Lano, A. , Lahti, J. , Wolke, D. and Räikkönen, K. (2018), Naturally occurring circadian rhythm and sleep duration are related to executive functions in early adulthood. J Sleep Res, 27: 113-119. doi:10.1111/jsr.12581

Naturally occurring circadian rhythm and sleep duration are related to executive functions in early adulthood

Saved in:
Author: Kuula, Liisa1; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina1; Heinonen, Kati1;
Organizations: 1Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
2National Institute for Health and Welfare, Chronic Disease Prevention Unit, Helsinki and Oulu, Finland
3Children´s Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital
4PEDEGO Research Unit, MRC Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
5Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
6Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland
7Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
8Department of Psychology and Division of Mental Health and Wellbeing, WMS; University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.7 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019111137573
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Publish Date: 2019-11-11
Description:

Abstract

Experimental sleep deprivation studies suggest that insufficient sleep and circadian misalignment associates with poorer executive function. It is not known whether this association translates to naturally occurring sleep patterns. A total of 512 of full‐term‐born members of the Arvo Ylppö Longitudinal Study [mean age = 25.3, standard deviation (SD) = 0.65] (44.3% men) wore actigraphs to define sleep duration, its irregularity and circadian rhythm (sleep mid‐point) during a 1‐week period (mean 6.9 nights, SD = 1.7). Performance‐based executive function was assessed with the Trail‐Making Test, Conners’ Continuous Performance Test and Stroop. The self‐rated adult version of Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function was used to assess trait‐like executive function. We found that performance‐based and self‐reported trait‐like executive function correlated only modestly (all correlations ≤0.17). Shorter sleep duration associated with more commission errors. Later circadian rhythm associated with poorer trait‐like executive function, as indicated by the Brief Metacognitive Index and the Behavior Regulation Index. Those belonging to the group with the most irregular sleep duration performed slower than others in the Trail‐Making Test Part A. All associations were adjusted for sex, age, socioeconomic status and body mass index. In conclusion, naturally occurring insufficient sleep and later circadian rhythm showed modest associations with poorer executive function. Shorter habitual sleep duration was associated with lower scores of performance‐based tests of executive function, and later circadian rhythm was associated mainly with poorer trait‐like executive function characteristics. Our findings suggest additionally that sleep duration and circadian rhythm associate with different domains of executive function, and there are no additive effects between the two.

see all

Series: Journal of sleep research
ISSN: 0962-1105
ISSN-E: 1365-2869
ISSN-L: 0962-1105
Volume: 27
Issue: 1
Pages: 113 - 119
DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12581
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/jsr.12581
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3111 Biomedicine
Subjects:
Copyright information: © 2017 European Sleep Research Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Kuula, L. , Pesonen, A. , Heinonen, K. , Kajantie, E. , Eriksson, J. G., Andersson, S. , Lano, A. , Lahti, J. , Wolke, D. and Räikkönen, K. (2018), Naturally occurring circadian rhythm and sleep duration are related to executive functions in early adulthood. J Sleep Res, 27: 113-119. doi:10.1111/jsr.12581, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.12581. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.