University of Oulu

Piano, E. , Souffreau, C. , Merckx, T. , Baardsen, L. F., Backeljau, T. , Bonte, D. , Brans, K. I., Cours, M. , Dahirel, M. , Debortoli, N. , Decaestecker, E. , De Wolf, K. , Engelen, J. M., Fontaneto, D. , Gianuca, A. T., Govaert, L. , Hanashiro, F. T., Higuti, J. , Lens, L. , Martens, K. , Matheve, H. , Matthysen, E. , Pinseel, E. , Sablon, R. , Schön, I. , Stoks, R. , Van Doninck, K. , Van Dyck, H. , Vanormelingen, P. , Van Wichelen, J. , Vyverman, W. , De Meester, L. and Hendrickx, F. (2019), Urbanization drives cross‐taxon declines in abundance and diversity at multiple spatial scales. Glob Change Biol. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/gcb.14934

Urbanization drives cross‐taxon declines in abundance and diversity at multiple spatial scales

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Author: Piano, Elena1,2; Souffreau, Caroline3; Merckx, Thomas4,5;
Organizations: 1Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, OD Taxonomy and Phylogeny, Brussels, Belgium
2Department of Life Sciences and System Biology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
3Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
4Behavioural Ecology and Conservation Group, Biodiversity Research Centre, Earth and Life Institute, UCLouvain, Louvain‐la‐Neuve, Belgium
5Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
6Evolutionary Ecology Group, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
7Terrestrial Ecology Unit, Biology Department, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
8Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, OD Natural Environment, Brussels, Belgium
9Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Evolution Unit, Université de Rennes 1 (CNRS), Rennes, France
10Laboratory of Evolutionary Genetics and Ecology, URBE, NAXYS, University of Namur, Namur, Belgium
11Laboratory of Aquatic Biology, KU Leuven Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium
12Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
13National Research Council, Water Research Institute, CNR‐IRSA, Verbania‐Pallanza, Italy
14Department of Ecology, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
15Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Aquatic Ecology, Dübendorf, Switzerland
16Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland
17Centre of Research in Limnology, Ichthyology and Aquaculture/PEA, State University of Maringá, Maringá, Brazil
18Laboratory of Limnology, Biology Department, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
19Laboratory of Protistology & Aquatic Ecology, Biology Department, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
20Research Department, Meise Botanic Garden, Meise, Belgium
21Zoology Research Group, University of Hasselt, Hasselt, Belgium
22Evolutionary Stress Ecology and Ecotoxicology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
23Aquatic Management, Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: embargoed
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019112744470
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Publish Date: 2020-11-22
Description:

Abstract

The increasing urbanization process is hypothesized to drastically alter (semi‐)natural environments with a concomitant major decline in species abundance and diversity. Yet, studies on this effect of urbanization, and the spatial scale at which it acts, are at present inconclusive due to the large heterogeneity in taxonomic groups and spatial scales at which this relationship has been investigated among studies. Comprehensive studies analysing this relationship across multiple animal groups and at multiple spatial scales are rare, hampering the assessment of how biodiversity generally responds to urbanization. We studied aquatic (cladocerans), limno‐terrestrial (bdelloid rotifers) and terrestrial (butterflies, ground beetles, ground‐ and web spiders, macro‐moths, orthopterans and snails) invertebrate groups using a hierarchical spatial design wherein three local‐scale (200 m × 200 m) urbanization levels were repeatedly sampled across three landscape‐scale (3 km × 3 km) urbanization levels. We tested for local and landscape urbanization effects on abundance and species richness of each group, whereby total richness was partitioned into the average richness of local communities and the richness due to variation among local communities. Abundances of the terrestrial active dispersers declined in response to local urbanization, with reductions up to 85% for butterflies, while passive dispersers did not show any clear trend. Species richness also declined with increasing levels of urbanization, but responses were highly heterogeneous among the different groups with respect to the richness component and the spatial scale at which urbanization impacts richness. Depending on the group, species richness declined due to biotic homogenization and/or local species loss. This resulted in an overall decrease in total richness across groups in urban areas. These results provide strong support to the general negative impact of urbanization on abundance and species richness within habitat patches and highlight the importance of considering multiple spatial scales and taxa to assess the impacts of urbanization.

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Series: Global change biology
ISSN: 1354-1013
ISSN-E: 1365-2486
ISSN-L: 1354-1013
Issue: Online
DOI: 10.1111/GCB.14934
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/GCB.14934
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Subjects:
Funding: This research has been funded by the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme Phase VII (P07/4) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office. Chantal Van Nieuwenhove and Pieter Vantieghem are gratefully acknowledged for sorting out the large amount of pitfall samples. We thank Aurélien Kaiser for his contribution to the sampling of butterflies and orthopterans, Edwin van den Berg for counting and identifying species in the zooplankton samples, Jasper Dierick for the sampling and identification of web spiders, and Marc Van Kerckvoorde and Marc Hanssen for the identification of ground beetles and snails respectively. FTTH was supported by the Science without Borders program [process number: 45968/2012-1] of Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico – Brazil. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.
Copyright information: © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Piano, E. , Souffreau, C. , Merckx, T. , Baardsen, L. F., Backeljau, T. , Bonte, D. , Brans, K. I., Cours, M. , Dahirel, M. , Debortoli, N. , Decaestecker, E. , De Wolf, K. , Engelen, J. M., Fontaneto, D. , Gianuca, A. T., Govaert, L. , Hanashiro, F. T., Higuti, J. , Lens, L. , Martens, K. , Matheve, H. , Matthysen, E. , Pinseel, E. , Sablon, R. , Schön, I. , Stoks, R. , Van Doninck, K. , Van Dyck, H. , Vanormelingen, P. , Van Wichelen, J. , Vyverman, W. , De Meester, L. and Hendrickx, F. (2019), Urbanization drives cross‐taxon declines in abundance and diversity at multiple spatial scales. Glob Change Biol. Accepted Author Manuscript., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/GCB.14934. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.