University of Oulu

Lindholm, M., Alahuhta, J., Heino, J. and Toivonen, H. (2019), No biotic homogenisation across decades but consistent effects of landscape position and pH on macrophyte communities in boreal lakes. Ecography. doi:10.1111/ecog.04757

No biotic homogenisation across decades but consistent effects of landscape position and pH on macrophyte communities in boreal lakes

Saved in:
Author: Lindholm, Marja1; Alahuhta, Janne1; Heino, Jani2;
Organizations: 1Univ. of Oulu, Geography Research Unit, Finland
2Finnish Environment Inst., Freshwater Centre, Oulu, Finland
3Kangasala Asema, Finland
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.9 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2019121948900
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Publish Date: 2019-12-19
Description:

Abstract

It has been predicted that spatial beta diversity shows a decreasing trend in the Anthropocene due to increasing human impact, causing biotic homogenisation. We aimed to discover if vascular aquatic macrophyte communities show different spatial patterns in beta diversity in relation to land use and environmental characteristics in different decades from 1940s to 2010s. We aimed to discover if spatial structures differ between species‐, phylogeny‐ and functional‐based beta diversity. We used presence–absence data of aquatic macrophytes from five decades from small boreal lakes. We utilized generalised dissimilarity modelling to analyse spatial patterns in beta diversity in relation to environmental gradients. We found that lake elevation and pH were the most important variables in each decade, while land use was not particularly important in shaping beta diversity patterns. We did not find signs of a decreasing trend in spatial beta diversity in our study area during the past 70 yr. We did not find signs of either biotic homogenisation or biotic differentiation (taxonomic, phylogenetic or functional). Vascular aquatic macrophyte communities showed only slightly different beta diversity patterns in relation to human impact across decades. The patterns of different facets of beta diversity diverged only slightly from each other. Lake position in the landscape, reflecting both natural connectivity and lake characteristics, explained the patterns found in beta diversity, probably because our study area has faced only modest changes in land use from 1940s to 2010s when compared globally. Our study highlights the fact that biotic homogenisation is not an unambiguous process acting similarly at all spatial and temporal scales or in different environments and different organism groups.

see all

Series: Ecography
ISSN: 0906-7590
ISSN-E: 1600-0587
ISSN-L: 0906-7590
Volume: 42
Issue: Online
DOI: 10.1111/ecog.04757
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/ecog.04757
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1172 Environmental sciences
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
119 Other natural sciences
Subjects:
Funding: Field work in 2017 was funded by Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation and Olvi Foundation.
Copyright information: © 2019 The Authors. Ecography published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/