University of Oulu

Heino, J. and Alahuhta, J. (2019), Knitting patterns of biodiversity, range size and body size in aquatic beetle faunas: significant relationships but slightly divergent drivers. Ecol Entomol, 44: 413-424. doi:10.1111/een.12717

Knitting patterns of biodiversity, range size and body size in aquatic beetle faunas : significant relationships but slightly divergent drivers

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Author: Heino, Jani1; Alahuhta, Janne2
Organizations: 1Finnish Environment Institute, Biodiversity Centre. P.O. Box 413, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
2Geography Research Unit, University of Oulu. P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.7 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe202001071394
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Publish Date: 2020-01-07
Description:

Abstract

1. Ecogeographical rules refer to recurring patterns in nature, including the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), Rapoport’s rule and Bergmann’s rule, amongst others. In the present study, the existence of these rules was examined for diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), a family of aquatic predatory beetles.

2. Assemblage‐level data were analysed for diving beetles, focusing on species richness, local contribution to beta diversity (LCBD), mean range size and mean body size across the biogeographical provinces of Northern Europe. First, each of these variables was correlated with latitude, and then variation in each variable was modelled using actual environmental variables in boosted regression tree analysis.

3. Species richness was found to decrease with latitude, LCBD increased with latitude, mean range size did not show a significant relationship with latitude, and mean body size decreased with latitude. The latter finding was in contrast to Bergmann’s rule. The actual environmental variables best predicting variation in these four response variables varied among the models, although they generally included temperature‐related and land use variables as the most influential ones.

4. The results obtained in the present study suggest that diving beetles conformed to the LDG, did not follow Rapoport’s rule, and showed a reversed latitudinal gradient in the context of Bergmann’s rule. In addition, species‐poor provinces harboured ecologically most unique faunas, suggesting that species richness and LCBD are complementary measures of biodiversity.

5. Even though general support was not found for most of the ecogeographical rules examined, the findings of the present study are interesting because they suggest that aquatic ectothermic invertebrates may show patterns different from those originally described for terrestrial endothermic vertebrates.

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Series: Ecological entomology
ISSN: 0307-6946
ISSN-E: 1365-2311
ISSN-L: 0307-6946
Volume: 44
Issue: 3
Pages: 413 - 424
DOI: 10.1111/een.12717
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/een.12717
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Subjects:
Copyright information: © 2019 The Royal Entomological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Heino, J. and Alahuhta, J. (2019), Knitting patterns of biodiversity, range size and body size in aquatic beetle faunas: significant relationships but slightly divergent drivers. Ecol Entomol, 44: 413-424, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/een.12717. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.