University of Oulu

Canington, SL, Sylvester, AD, Burgess, ML, Junno, J‐A, Ruff, CB. Long bone diaphyseal shape follows different ontogenetic trajectories in captive and wild gorillas. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018; 167: 366– 376. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23636

Long bone diaphyseal shape follows different ontogenetic trajectories in captive and wild gorillas

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Author: Canington, Stephanie L.1; Sylvester, Adam D.1; Burgess, M. Loring1;
Organizations: 1Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
2Department of Archaeology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.6 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe202002105000
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Publish Date: 2020-02-10
Description:

Abstract

Objectives: A number of studies have demonstrated the ontogenetic plasticity of long bone diaphyseal structure in response to mechanical loading. Captivity should affect mechanical loading of the limbs, but whether captive apes grow differently than wild apes has been debated. Here, we compare captive and wild juvenile and adult Gorilla to ascertain whether growth trajectories in cross‐sectional diaphyseal shape are similar in the two environments.

Materials and methods: A sample of young juvenile (n = 4) and adult (n = 10) captive Gorilla gorilla gorilla specimens, with known life histories, were compared with age‐matched wild G.g. gorilla (n = 62) and G. beringei beringei (n = 75) in relative anteroposterior to mediolateral bending strength of the femur, tibia, and humerus. Cross sections were obtained using peripheral quantitative CT.

Results: Captive and wild adult G.g. gorilla differed in bending strength ratios for all three bones, but these differences were not present in young juvenile G.g. gorilla. In comparisons across taxa, captive juvenile G.g. gorilla were more similar to wild G.g. gorilla than to G.b. beringei, while captive adult G.g. gorilla were more similar in shape to G.b. beringei in the hind limb.

Discussion: Captive and wild G. gorilla follow different ontogenetic trajectories in long bone diaphyseal shape, corresponding to environmental differences and subsequent modified locomotor behaviors. Differences related to phylogeny are most evident early in development.

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Series: American journal of physical anthropology
ISSN: 0002-9483
ISSN-E: 1096-8644
ISSN-L: 0002-9483
Volume: 167
Issue: 2
Pages: 366 - 376
DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.23636
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23636
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
520 Other social sciences
Subjects:
Funding: National Geographic Society's Committee for Research and Exploration, Grant/Award Number: 8486‐08; Wenner‐Gren Foundation, Grant/Award Number: 8657; George Washington University; Leakey Foundation; National Geographic Society; National Science Foundation; George Washington University; Oulun Yliopisto; Wenner‐Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research; Leakey Foundation; National Science Foundation, Grant/Award Number: BCS‐0852866BCS‐0964944BCS‐1316104BCS‐1419564.
Copyright information: © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Canington, SL, Sylvester, AD, Burgess, ML, Junno, J‐A, Ruff, CB. Long bone diaphyseal shape follows different ontogenetic trajectories in captive and wild gorillas. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018; 167: 366– 376, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23636. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving."