University of Oulu

Telfer, A., deWaard, J., Young, M., Quinn, J., Perez, K., Sobel, C., Sones, J., Levesque-Beaudin, V., Derbyshire, R., Fernandez-Triana, J., Rougerie, R., Thevanayagam, A., Boskovic, A., Borisenko, A., Cadel, A., Brown, A., Pages, A., Castillo, A., Nicolai, A., Glenn Mockford, B., Bukowski, B., Wilson, B., Trojahn, B., Lacroix, C., Brimblecombe, C., Hay, C., Ho, C., Steinke, C., Warne, C., Garrido Cortes, C., Engelking, D., Wright, D., Lijtmaer, D., Gascoigne, D., Hernandez Martich, D., Morningstar, D., Neumann, D., Steinke, D., Marco DeBruin, D., Dobias, D., Sears, E., Richard, E., Damstra, E., Zakharov, E., Laberge, F., Collins, G., Blagoev, G., Grainge, G., Ansell, G., Meredith, G., Hogg, I., McKeown, J., Topan, J., Bracey, J., Guenther, J., Sills-Gilligan, J., Addesi, J., Persi, J., Layton, K., D'Souza, K., Dorji, K., Grundy, K., Nghidinwa, K., Ronnenberg, K., Lee, K., Xie, L., Lu, L., Penev, L., Gonzalez, M., Rosati, M., Kekkonen, M., Kuzmina, M., Is! kandar, M., Mutanen, M., Fatahi, M., Pentinsaari, M., Bauman, M., Nikolova, N., Ivanova, N., Jones, N., Weerasuriya, N., Monkhouse, N., Lavinia, P., Jannetta, P., Hanisch, P., McMullin, R., Ojeda Flores, R., Mouttet, R., Vender, R., Labbee, R., Forsyth, R., Lauder, R., Dickson, R., Kroft, R., Miller, S., MacDonald, S., Panthi, S., Pedersen, S., Sobek-Swant, S., Naik, S., Lipinskaya, T., Eagalle, T., Decaëns, T., Kosuth, T., Braukmann, T., Woodcock, T., Roslin, T., Zammit, T., Campbell, V., Dinca, V., Peneva, V., Hebert, P. (2015) Biodiversity inventories in high gear: DNA barcoding facilitates a rapid biotic survey of a temperate nature reserve. Biodiversity data journal, 3, e6313. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.3.e6313

Biodiversity inventories in high gear : DNA barcoding facilitates a rapid biotic survey of a temperate nature reserve

Saved in:
Author: Telfer, Angela C.1; Young, Monica R.1; Quinn, Jenna2;
Perez, Kate1; Sobel, Crystal N.1; Sones, Jayme E.1; Levesque-Beaudin, Valerie1; Derbyshire, Rachael1; Fernandez-Triana, Jose3; Rougerie, Rodolphe4; Thevanayagam, Abinah1; Boskovic, Adrian1; Borisenko, Alex, V1; Cadel, Alex5; Brown, Allison1; Pages, Anais6; Castillo, Anibal H.1; Nicolai, Annegret7; Mockford, Barb Mockford Glenn8; Bukowski, Belen9; Wilson, Bill8; Trojahn, Brock2; Lacroix, Carole Ann10; Brimblecombe, Chris11; Hay, Christoper12; Ho, Christmas1; Steinke, Claudia1; Warne, Connor P.1; Cortes, Cristina Garrido13; Engelking, Daniel1; Wright, Danielle1; Lijtmaer, Dario A.9; Gascoigne, David8; Martich, David Hernandez14; Morningstar, Derek15; Neumann, Dirk16; Steinke, Dirk1; DeBruin, Donna Debruin Marco8; Dobias, Dylan13; Sears, Elizabeth1; Richard, Ellen13; Damstra, Emily8; Zakharov, Evgeny, V1; Laberge, Frederic13; Collins, Gemma E.11; Blagoev, Gergin A.1; Grainge, Gerrie8; Ansell, Graham1; Meredith, Greg17; Hogg, Ian11; McKeown, Jaclyn1; Topan, Janet1; Bracey, Jason8; Guenther, Jerry8; Sills-Gilligan, Jesse1; Addesi, Joseph1; Persi, Joshua1; Layton, Kara K. S.18; D'Souza, Kareina1; Dorji, Kencho19; Grundy, Kevin8; Nghidinwa, Kirsti20; Ronnenberg, Kylee1; Lee, Kyung Min21; Xie, Linxi12; Lu, Liuqiong1; Penev, Lyubomir22; Gonzalez, Mailyn23; Rosati, Margaret E.24; Kekkonen, Mari1; Kuzmina, Maria1; Iskandar, Marianne1; Mutanen, Marko21; Fatahi, Maryam1; Pentinsaari, Mikko21; Bauman, Miriam8; Nikolova, Nadya21; Ivanova, Natalia, V21; Jones, Nathaniel21; Weerasuriya, Nimalka12; Monkhouse, Norman1; Lavinia, Pablo D.9; Jannetta, Paul1; Hanisch, Priscila E.9; McMullin, R. Troy9; Flores, Rafael Ojeda25; Mouttet, Raphaelle26; Vender, Reid1; Labbee, Renee N.1; Forsyth, Robert27; Lauder, Rob28; Dickson, Ross8; Kroft, Ruth8; Miller, Scott E.24; MacDonald, Shannon1; Panthi, Sishir29; Pedersen, Stephanie1; Sobek-Swant, Stephanie2; Naik, Suresh1; Lipinskaya, Tatsiana30; Eagalle, Thanushi1; Decaens, Thibaud31; Kosuth, Thibault6; Braukmann, Thomas1; Woodcock, Tom3; Roslin, Tomas32,33; Zammit, Tony34; Campbell, Victoria1; Dinca, Vlad1; Peneva, Vlada35; Hebert, Paul D. N.1; deWaard, Jeremy R.1
Organizations: 1Biodivers Inst Ontario, Guelph, ON, Canada.
2Rare Charitable Res Reserve, Cambridge, ON, Canada.
3CNC, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
4Museum Natl Hist Nat, Paris, France.
5Univ Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.
6Univ Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
7Univ Rennes, EcoBio, Rennes, France.
8Rare Charitable Res Reserve Affiliate, Cambridge, ON, Canada.
9Museo Argentine Ciencias Nat Bernardino Rivadavia, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
10Biodivers Inst Ontario Herbarium, Guelph, ON, Canada.
11Univ Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.
12Univ Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada.
13Univ Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
14Univ Autonoma Santo Domingo DR, Santo Domingo, Dominican Rep.
15Myotistar, Cambridge, ON, Canada.
16Zool Staatssammlung Muenchen, SNSB, Munich, Germany.
17Grand River Conservat Author, Guelph, ON, Canada.
18Univ Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
19Natl Biodivers Ctr, Thimphu, Bhutan.
20Minist Environm & Tourism Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia.
21Univ Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
22Pensoft, Sofia, Bulgaria.
23Inst Invest Recursos Biol Alexander von Humboldt, Bogota, Colombia.
24Smithsonian Natl Museum Nat Hist, Washington, DC USA.
25Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
26ANSES, Lab Sante Vegetaux, Montferrier Sur Lez, France.
27New Brunswick Museum, St John, NB, Canada.
28London Homeopathy, London, ON, Canada.
29Minist Forests & Soil Conservat, Kathmandu, Nepal.
30Natl Acad Sci Belarus, Sci & Pract Ctr Bioresources, Minsk, BELARUS.
31Univ Montpellier, Ctr Ecol Fonct & Evolut, Montpellier, France.
32Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
33Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
34Grand River Conservat Author, Cambridge, ON, Canada.
35Bulgarian Acad Sci, Sofia, Bulgaria.
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.8 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe202003319852
Language: English
Published: Pensoft Publishers, 2015
Publish Date: 2020-03-31
Description:

Abstract

Background: Comprehensive biotic surveys, or ‘all taxon biodiversity inventories’ (ATBI), have traditionally been limited in scale or scope due to the complications surrounding specimen sorting and species identification. To circumvent these issues, several ATBI projects have successfully integrated DNA barcoding into their identification procedures and witnessed acceleration in their surveys and subsequent increase in project scope and scale. The Biodiversity Institute of Ontario partnered with the rare Charitable Research Reserve and delegates of the 6th International Barcode of Life Conference to complete its own rapid, barcode-assisted ATBI of an established land trust in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada.

New information: The existing species inventory for the rare Charitable Research Reserve was rapidly expanded by integrating a DNA barcoding workflow with two surveying strategies — a comprehensive sampling scheme over four months, followed by a one-day bioblitz involving international taxonomic experts. The two surveys resulted in 25,287 and 3,502 specimens barcoded, respectively, as well as 127 human observations. This barcoded material, all vouchered at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario collection, covers 14 phyla, 29 classes, 117 orders, and 531 families of animals, plants, fungi, and lichens. Overall, the ATBI documented 1,102 new species records for the nature reserve, expanding the existing long-term inventory by 49%. In addition, 2,793 distinct Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) were assigned to genus or higher level taxonomy, and represent additional species that will be added once their taxonomy is resolved. For the 3,502 specimens, the collection, sequence analysis, taxonomic assignment, data release and manuscript submission by 100+ co-authors all occurred in less than one week. This demonstrates the speed at which barcode-assisted inventories can be completed and the utility that barcoding provides in minimizing and guiding valuable taxonomic specialist time. The final product is more than a comprehensive biotic inventory — it is also a rich dataset of fine-scale occurrence and sequence data, all archived and cross-linked in the major biodiversity data repositories. This model of rapid generation and dissemination of essential biodiversity data could be followed to conduct regional assessments of biodiversity status and change, and potentially be employed for evaluating progress towards the Aichi Targets of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020.

see all

Series: Biodiversity data journal
ISSN: 1314-2836
ISSN-E: 1314-2828
ISSN-L: 1314-2836
Volume: 3
Article number: e6313
DOI: 10.3897/BDJ.3.e6313
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.3897/BDJ.3.e6313
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Subjects:
Funding: Financial support was provided by the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation and by the government of Canada through Genome Canada and the Ontario Genomics Institute in support of the International Barcode of Life project.
Copyright information: © Telfer A et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/