University of Oulu

January, S.A., Mason, W.A., Savolainen, J. et al. Longitudinal Pathways from Cumulative Contextual Risk at Birth to School Functioning in Adolescence: Analysis of Mediation Effects and Gender Moderation. J Youth Adolescence 46, 180–196 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0560-9

Longitudinal athways from cumulative contextual risk at birth to school functioning in adolescence : analysis of mediation effects and gender moderation

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Author: January, Stacy-Ann A.1; Mason, W. Alex2; Savolainen, Jukka3;
Organizations: 1University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
2Boys Town National Research Institute of Child and Family Studies, Boys Town, NE, USA
3Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
4School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska–Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA
5Center for Life Course Epidemiology and Systems Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
6Medical Research Center Oulu, Research Unit of Clinical Neurosciences, Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
7Department of Psychiatry, Unit of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
8Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
9PEDEGO Research Center, Child Psychiatry, Medical Research Center, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
10Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
11Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK
12Center for Life Course Epidemiology and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
13Unit of Primary Care, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.6 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2020040610441
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2017
Publish Date: 2020-04-06
Description:

Abstract

Children and adolescents exposed to multiple contextual risks are more likely to have academic difficulties and externalizing behavior problems than those who experience fewer risks. This study used data from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (a population-based study; N = 6961; 51 % female) to investigate (a) the impact of cumulative contextual risk at birth on adolescents’ academic performance and misbehavior in school, (b) learning difficulties and/or externalizing behavior problems in childhood as intervening mechanisms in the association of cumulative contextual risk with functioning in adolescence, and (c) potential gender differences in the predictive associations of cumulative contextual risk at birth with functioning in childhood or adolescence. The results of the structural equation modeling analysis suggested that exposure to cumulative contextual risk at birth had negative associations with functioning 16 years later, and academic difficulties and externalizing behavior problems in childhood mediated some of the predictive relations. Gender, however, did not moderate any of the associations. Therefore, the findings of this study have implications for the prevention of learning and conduct problems in youth and future research on the impact of cumulative risk exposure.

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Series: Journal of youth and adolescence
ISSN: 0047-2891
ISSN-E: 1573-6601
ISSN-L: 0047-2891
Volume: 46
Issue: 1; SI
Pages: 180 - 196
DOI: 10.1007/s10964-016-0560-9
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0560-9
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3124 Neurology and psychiatry
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
Subjects:
Funding: The analyses reported herein were supported by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), U.S. National Institutes of Health, Grant # R01DA038450. Preparation and development of this manuscript was also supported by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education, through Grant R324B110001. The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 study received support from the Academy of Finland (#268336), the European Commission (EURO-BLCS, Framework 5 award QLG1-CT-2000-01643), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), US National Institutes of Health (R01MH63706:02).
Academy of Finland Grant Number: 268336
Detailed Information: 268336 (Academy of Finland Funding decision)
Copyright information: © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Journal of Youth and Adolescence. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0560-9.