University of Oulu

van Kessel, R., Walsh, S., Ruigrok, A.N.V. et al. Autism and the right to education in the EU: policy mapping and scoping review of Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. Molecular Autism 10, 44 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13229-019-0290-4

Autism and the right to education in the EU : policy mapping and scoping review of Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, and Sweden

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Author: van Kessel, Robin1; Walsh, Sebastian2; Ruigrok, Amber N. V.3;
Organizations: 1Department of International Health, School CAPHRI, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands
2Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
3Autism Research Centre, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
4Child Language Research Center, Logopedics, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
5Philosophical Faculty, School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
6PEDEGO, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
7Child Psychiatric Clinic, University Hospital of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
8Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
9iPSYCH, The Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research, Aarhus, Denmark
10National Centre for Register-Based Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
11Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
12Center for Autisme, Herlev, Denmark
13Special Area Autism, Central Region, Aarhus, Denmark
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 1 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2020042822756
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2019
Publish Date: 2020-04-28
Description:

Abstract

Introduction: The universal right to education for people with disabilities has been highlighted by the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. In this paper, we mapped policies addressing the right to education and special education needs of autistic children in Denmark, Sweden, and Finland.

Methods: A policy path analysis was carried out using a scoping review as an underlying framework for data gathering. Policy mapping was performed independently by both lead authors to increase reliability.

Results and discussion: The values of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities have been closely translated into the respective education systems of the countries under study, offering special education needs services and support in mainstream education with the aim of including as many children into mainstream education as possible. Even though the education systems are comparable, the approaches between the countries under study are slightly different. Denmark and Sweden have passed several policies specifically geared towards special education needs, while Finland incorporates this more in general education policy.

Conclusion: All countries under study have incorporated the values of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in their respective education systems while emphasising the need to include as many children in the mainstream system as possible.

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Series: Molecular autism
ISSN: 2040-2392
ISSN-E: 2040-2392
ISSN-L: 2040-2392
Volume: 20
Article number: 44
DOI: 10.1186/s13229-019-0290-4
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1186/s13229-019-0290-4
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 516 Educational sciences
616 Other humanities
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
Subjects:
Funding: The project leading to this application has received funding from the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking (JU) under grant agreement no. 777394. The JU receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and EFPIA and AUTISM SPEAKS, Autistica, SFARI. Dr. Andres Roman-Urrestarazu’s work received funding from the Gillings Fellowship in Global Public Health and Autism Research, Grant Award YOG054. Dr. Rosemary Holt and Dr. Amber Ruigrok received funding from the Innovative Medicines Initiative EU-AIMS (grant agreement no. 115300: FP7/2007–2013). Simon Baron-Cohen was supported by the Autism Research Trust, Autistica, and the MRC during the period of this work. Dr Andres Roman-Urrestarazu’s work received funding from the Gillings Fellowship in Global Public Health and Autism Research, Grant Award YOG054. SBC, AR, and RH received funding from Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking (JU) under grant agreement no. 777394. The JU receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and EFPIA and AUTISM SPEAKS, Autistica, SFARI. They also receive funding from the Autism Research Trust, Autistica, the MRC, the Wellcome Trust and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. The research was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care East of England at Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, NIHR, or Department of Health and Social Care.
Copyright information: © The Author(s). 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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