University of Oulu

Yliniemi, J., Walkley, B., Provis, J.L. et al. Influence of activator type on reaction kinetics, setting time, and compressive strength of alkali-activated mineral wools. J Therm Anal Calorim (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10973-020-09651-6

Influence of activator type on reaction kinetics, setting time, and compressive strength of alkali-activated mineral wools

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Author: Yliniemi, J.1; Walkley, B.2,3; Provis, J. L.2;
Organizations: 1Fibre and Particle Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4300, 90014, Oulu, Finland
2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin St, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
3Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin St, Sheffield, S1 3JD, UK
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.7 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2020061644616
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2020
Publish Date: 2020-06-16
Description:

Abstract

Alkali activation is a promising utilisation route for mineral wool wastes, due to suitable chemical composition, high reactivity, and surface area. One key factor in the development of alkali-activated binders is the selection of the suitable alkali activator. Here, the effect of sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate solution on the alkali-activation kinetics of two main types of mineral wools, stone wool and glass wool, is investigated. Setting time and compressive strength development results are presented, which are explained and discussed in the context of isothermal calorimeter data obtained at temperature of 40 °C. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solutions provided fast reaction with both mineral wools, evidenced by high heat release, high early strength, and fast setting. The reaction with sodium aluminate solution took several days to initiate, but it produced high compressive strength after 28 days of curing with both mineral wools. Glass wool reacted and hardened rapidly with sodium carbonate solution, but stone wool reacted slowly with sodium carbonate and exhibited a low extent of reaction, likely due to lower extent of reaction of stone wool under less alkaline conditions. These results show that mineral wool alkali activation kinetics and binder gel formation are controlled by the activator type and highlight the importance of choosing the most appropriate activator for each desired application.

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Series: Journal of thermal analysis and calorimetry
ISSN: 1388-6150
ISSN-E: 1572-8943
ISSN-L: 1388-6150
Volume: In press
DOI: 10.1007/s10973-020-09651-6
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1007/s10973-020-09651-6
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 116 Chemical sciences
215 Chemical engineering
216 Materials engineering
Subjects:
Funding: Open access funding provided by University of Oulu including Oulu University Hospital. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support received from the project “Geodesign—Design geopolymers from mineral side streams” funded by Business Finland and companies Boliden Harjavalta Oy, Destaclean Oy, Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Paroc Group Oy, Saint-Gobain Finland Oy, and Suomen Erityisjäte Oy (Grant No. 1251/31/2015).
Copyright information: © The Author(s) 2020. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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