University of Oulu

Hanhivaara, J., Määttä, J.H., Niinimäki, J. et al. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae are associated with lumbar degeneration: retrospective evaluation of 3855 consecutive abdominal CT scans. Eur Radiol 30, 3409–3416 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-06691-2

Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae are associated with lumbar degeneration : retrospective evaluation of 3855 consecutive abdominal CT scans

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Author: Hanhivaara, Jaakko1,2; Määttä, Juhani H.2,3; Niinimäki, Jaakko1,2,3;
Organizations: 1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029, Oulu, Finland
2Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 8000, Oulu, Finland
3Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, POB 5000, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.8 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2020110288931
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2020
Publish Date: 2020-11-02
Description:

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) and associated spinal degenerative changes on abdominal CT scans in Caucasian population.

Material and methods: A total of 3855 abdominal CT scans of the year 2017 from a single hospital were retrospectively assessed for LSTV, disc degeneration (DD), and facet joint degeneration (FD). An age- and sex-matched 150-subject control group without LSTV was picked at random. Multivariable logistic regression was used for the analysis.

Results: LSTV was found in 1101 (29%) scans: Castellvi type I in 68%, type II in 16%, type III in 13%, and type IV in 3% of scans. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of DD was significantly higher in Castellvi type II and III groups at multiple lumbar levels, and in IV group at L4/5 than in control group (p < 0.001–0.034). At L5/S1, the prevalence of DD was significantly higher in the control group than in type II, III, or IV groups (p < 0.001–0.017). After combining Castellvi types II, III, and IV into one group, significant differences were found at all lumbar levels except L2/3 (p < 0.001–0.016). Prevalence of FD was significantly higher at L4/5 in Castellvi groups I, II, and III than in the control group (p < 0.001–0.002). When Castellvi types II, III, and IV were combined into one group, significant differences were found at lumbar levels L2/3, L3/4, and L4/5 (p < 0.001–0.021).

Conclusion: Lumbosacral vertebrae of Castellvi types II, III, and IV are associated with greater lumbar degeneration, warranting meticulous evaluation of spinal anatomy, even on CT.

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Series: European radiology
ISSN: 0938-7994
ISSN-E: 1432-1084
ISSN-L: 0938-7994
Volume: 30
Issue: 6
Pages: 3409 - 3416
DOI: 10.1007/s00330-020-06691-2
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1007/s00330-020-06691-2
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
Subjects:
Funding: Open access funding provided by University of Oulu including Oulu University Hospital. The authors state that this work has not received any funding.
Copyright information: © The Author(s) 2020. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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