University of Oulu

Lavrinienko, A, Tukalenko, E, Kesäniemi, J, et al. Applying the Anna Karenina principle for wild animal gut microbiota: Temporal stability of the bank vole gut microbiota in a disturbed environment. J Anim Ecol. 2020; 00: 1– 14. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13342

Applying the Anna Karenina principle for wild animal gut microbiota : temporal stability of the bank vole gut microbiota in a disturbed environment

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Author: Lavrinienko, Anton1; Tukalenko, Eugene1,2; Kesäniemi, Jenni1;
Organizations: 1Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
2National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Science, Kyiv, Ukraine
3Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland
4Ukrainian Radiation Protection Institute, Kyiv, Ukraine
5CIBIO-InBIO Associate Laboratory, Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, University of Porto, Vairão, Portugal
6Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
7Space Physics Laboratory, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine
8College of Physics, International Center of Future Science, Jilin University, Changchun, China
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: embargoed
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2020110389099
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Publish Date: 2021-09-16
Description:

Abstract

1. Gut microbiota play an important role in host health. Yet, the drivers and patterns of microbiota imbalance (dysbiosis) in wild animals remain largely unexplored.

2. One hypothesised outcome of stress on animal microbiomes is a destabilised microbial community that is characterised by an increase in inter‐individual differences compared with microbiomes of healthy animals, which are expected to be (a) temporally stable and (b) relatively similar among individuals. This set of predictions for response of microbiomes to stressors is known as the Anna Karenina principle (AKP) for animal microbiomes.

3. We examine the AKP in a wild mammal inhabiting disturbed environments by conducting a capture–mark–recapture survey of bank voles Myodes glareolus in areas that contrast in levels of radionuclide contamination (Chernobyl, Ukraine).

4. Counter to key predictions of the AKP, bank voles that are not exposed to radionuclides harbour variable (increased inter‐individual differences) and temporally dynamic gut microbiota communities, presumably tracking the natural spatio‐temporal variation in resources. Conversely, bank voles exposed to radionuclides host more similar gut microbiota communities that are temporally stable, potentially due to a dysbiosis or selection (on host or bacteria) imposed by chronic radiation exposure.

5. The implication of these data is that environmental stress (radiation exposure) can constrain the natural spatial and temporal variation of wild animal gut microbiota.

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Series: Journal of animal ecology
ISSN: 0021-8790
ISSN-E: 1365-2656
ISSN-L: 0021-8790
DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.13342
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13342
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Subjects:
Funding: This work was supported by the Academy of Finland (project numbers 287153 and 268670, to P.C.W. and T.M.) and by the University of Oulu Graduate School (to A.L.). Support to T.A.M. was provided by the Samuel Freeman Charitable Trust, the University of South Carolina Office of Research, and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS).
Academy of Finland Grant Number: 287153
Detailed Information: 287153 (Academy of Finland Funding decision)
Copyright information: © 2020 British Ecological Society. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Lavrinienko, A, Tukalenko, E, Kesäniemi, J, et al. Applying the Anna Karenina principle for wild animal gut microbiota: Temporal stability of the bank vole gut microbiota in a disturbed environment. J Anim Ecol. 2020; 00: 1– 14, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13342. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.