University of Oulu

Äikäs, T., Kuusela, J., Salmi, A. (2020) Hunters, fishers, traders : an archaeological and zooarchaeological perspective on the development of the late iron age and medieval northern Fennoscandian trade network. Estonian Journal of Archaeology, 24 (2), 141. https://doi.org/10.3176/arch.2020.2.02

Hunters, fishers, traders : an archaeological and zooarchaeological perspective on the development of the late iron age and medieval northern Fennoscandian trade network

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Author: Kuusela, Jari-­Matti1; Salmi, Anna-Kaisa2; Äikäs, Tiina2
Organizations: 1The Regional Museum of Lapland, Pohjoisranta 4, FI­ 96200 Rovaniemi
2Department of Archaeology, P.O. Box 8000, FI­ 90014 University of Oulu,Finland
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 2.5 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe202102175167
Language: English
Published: Estonian Academy Publishers, 2020
Publish Date: 2021-02-17
Description:

Abstract

Late Iron Age and medieval trade in northern Fennoscandia has arguably often thought to have been primarily fur trade. However, recent discoveries of Late Iron Age and early medieval sites in the north together with the re-examination of previous evidence reveals a more nuanced picture and indicates that trade in bulk goods — namely inland stockfish and reindeer products — may have played a significant role in the northern trade. This article examines both archaeological and zooarchaeological evidence from several sites in northern Fennoscandia from the perspective of trade economy, and it is suggested that the northern trade began to flourish at the beginning of the Viking Age in the early 9th century and may have been driven by the demand of fish by the European markets. It is also suggested that at the beginning of the 13th century at the latest, the trade economic importance of reindeer became prominent and would increasingly remain so up until the historical period. The authors therefore suggest that although the role of furs in the northern trade was significant, reindeer hunting and inland fishing should also be considered to have been of major trade economic importance.

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Series: Estonian journal of archaeology
ISSN: 1406-2933
ISSN-E: 1736-7484
ISSN-L: 1406-2933
Volume: 24
Issue: 2
Pages: 141 - 160
DOI: 10.3176/arch.2020.2.02
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.3176/arch.2020.2.02
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 615 History and archaeology
Subjects:
Funding: This work was supported by the Finnish Cultural Foundation under Grant 00190586 (Jari­-Matti Kuusela); Academy of Finland under Grant 285774 (Anna­-Kaisa Salmi); and European Research Council under Grant StG 756431 (Anna­-Kaisa Salmi). The publication costs of this article were covered by theEstonian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of History and Archaeology at the University of Tartu, and the Institute of History, Archaeology and Art History of Tallinn University.
Academy of Finland Grant Number: 285774
Detailed Information: 285774 (Academy of Finland Funding decision)
Copyright information: © 2020 The Author(s). The Estonian Journal of Archaeology is an international open access journal and applies the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License to all its articles.
  https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/