University of Oulu

Turunen, J., Tejesvi, M.V., Paalanne, N. et al. Presence of distinctive microbiome in the first-pass meconium of newborn infants. Sci Rep 11, 19449 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-98951-4

Presence of distinctive microbiome in the first-pass meconium of newborn infants

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Author: Turunen, Jenni1,2; Tejesvi, Mysore V.2,3; Paalanne, Niko1,4;
Organizations: 1Medical Research Center and PEDEGO Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
2Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
3Ecology and Genetics, Faculty of Science, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
4Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
5Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
6Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
7Department of Pathology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: published version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 3.2 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2021101450978
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2021
Publish Date: 2021-10-14
Description:

Abstract

We critically evaluated the fetal microbiome concept in 44 neonates with placenta, amniotic fluid, and first-pass meconium samples. Placental histology showed no signs of inflammation. Meconium samples were more often bacterial culture positive after vaginal delivery. In next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S gene, before and after removal of extracellular and PCR contaminant DNA, the median number of reads was low in placenta (48) and amniotic fluid (46) and high in meconium samples (14,556 C-section, 24,860 vaginal). In electron microscopy, meconium samples showed extracellular vesicles. Utilizing the analysis of composition of microbiomes (ANCOM) against water, meconium samples had a higher relative abundance of Firmicutes, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Escherichia-Shigella. Our results did not support the existence of the placenta and amniotic fluid microbiota in healthy pregnancies. The first-pass meconium samples, formed in utero, appeared to harbor a microbiome that may be explained by perinatal colonization or intrauterine colonization via bacterial extracellular vesicles.

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Series: Scientific reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
ISSN-E: 2045-2322
ISSN-L: 2045-2322
Volume: 11
Article number: 19449
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-98951-4
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-98951-4
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
Subjects:
Funding: JR wishes to thank the Academy of Finland for Grants 299749 and 328768. TT would like to thank the Academy of Finland for Clinical Research Grant 2018-2022 and Pediatric Research Foundation Grant 2019-2022.
Academy of Finland Grant Number: 299749
328768
Detailed Information: 299749 (Academy of Finland Funding decision)
328768 (Academy of Finland Funding decision)
Copyright information: © The Author(s) 2021. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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