University of Oulu

ulin, M., Saukkonen, J., Oura, P., Junno, J.-A., Niemelä, M., Määttä, J., Niinimäki, J., Jämsä, T., Korpelainen, R., & Karppinen, J. (2020). Association Between Vertebral Dimensions and Lumbar Modic Changes. Spine 46(7), E415–E425. https://doi.org/10.1097/brs.0000000000003797

Association between vertebral dimensions and lumbar Modic changes

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Author: Julin, Marella Modarress1,2; Saukkonen, Jesperi1,2; Oura, Petteri1,2,3;
Organizations: 1Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu PO Box 5000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
2Center for Life Course Health Research, PO Box 5000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
3Research Unit of Medical Imaging, Physics and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, PO Box 5000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
4Cancer and Translational Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu PO Box 5000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
5Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Humanities, University of Oulu PO Box 5000, FI-90014 University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
6Diagnostic Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 10, FI-90029 OYS, Finland
7Oulu Deaconess Institute Foundation sr, Department of Sports and Exercise Medicine, PO Box 365, FI-90100 Oulu, Finland
8Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Aapistie 1, FI-90220 Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.4 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe202201179035
Language: English
Published: Wolters Kluwer, 2021
Publish Date: 2022-04-01
Description:

Abstract

Study Design: Population-based birth cohort study.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between vertebral dimensions and lumbar MC.

Summary of Background Data: Low back pain (LBP) has become the leading cause of disability worldwide. Modic changes (MC) of the lumbar spine are one potential LBP-associated etiological factor. Mechanical stress is considered to play a key role in the development of MC through damage to endplates. There is speculation that vertebral dimensions play a role in some degenerative changes in the spine. Previous studies have also shown a positive association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and both vertebral dimensions and MC. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between vertebral dimensions and MC.

Methods: The study population consisted of 1221 participants from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 who underwent lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and physical activity measurements at the age of 46–48. The presence of Type 1 (MC1) and Type 2 (MC2) MC and the height, axial cross-sectional area (CSA), and volume of the L4 vertebra were determined from MRI scans. MVPA (≥3.5 metabolic equivalents) was measured by a wrist-worn accelerometer. We analyzed the association between lumbar MC and vertebral height, CSA, and volume using logistic regression models before and after adjustment for sex, height, weight, smoking, education level, and MVPA.

Results: Vertebral height was positively associated with the presence of MC2 (odds ratio [OR] 3.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43–8.65), whereas vertebral CSA was not associated with the presence of lumbar MC. Vertebral volume was positively associated with the presence of any MC (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.00–1.07), but the association did not persist when analyzing MC1 and MC2 separately.

Conclusions: Vertebral height was associated with the presence of MC2. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of vertebral dimensions as independent risk factors for MC.

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Series: Spine
ISSN: 0362-2436
ISSN-E: 1528-1159
ISSN-L: 0362-2436
Volume: 46
Issue: 7
Pages: E415 - E425
DOI: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000003797
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000003797
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
Subjects:
MRI
Funding: NFBC1966 received financial support from University of Oulu Grant no. 24000692, Oulu University Hospital Grant no. 24301140, and ERDF European Regional Development Fund Grant no. 539/2010 A31592. The study was financially supported by the Ministry of Education and Culture in Finland, grant numbers OKM/86/626/2014, OKM/43/626/2015, OKM/17/626/2016, OKM/54/626/2019, and OKM/85/626/2019.
Copyright information: © 2020 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. The final authenticated version is available online at https: https://doi.org/10.1097/brs.0000000000003797.