University of Oulu

Seabloom, E.W., Batzer, E., Chase, J.M., Stanley Harpole, W., Adler, P.B., Bagchi, S., et al (2021) Species loss due to nutrient addition increases with spatial scale in global grasslands. Ecology Letters, 24, 2100– 2112. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13838

Species loss due to nutrient addition increases with spatial scale in global grasslands

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Author: Seabloom, Eric W.1; Batzer, Evan2; Chase, Jonathan M.3,4;
Organizations: 1Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota. St. Paul, MN, USA
2Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
3German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena- Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
4Department of Computer Sciences, Martin Luther University, Halle (Saale), Germany
5Department of Physiological Diversity, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research –UFZ, Leipzig, Germany
6Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany
7Department of Wildland Resources and the Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA
8Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
9School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
10Faculty of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Agricultural University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland
11Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames Iowa, USA
12Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL, US
13Centre for Applied Ecology "Prof. Baeta Neves" (CEABN-InBIO), School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
14Forest Research Centre, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
15Department of Geography, King's College London, London, UK
16Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (IIMyC), UNMDP –CONICET, Mar del Plata, Argentina
17Institute of Biology, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany
18Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
19Institute of Biology / Geobotany and Botanical Garden, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany
20Department of Biology and Environmental Studies Program, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA
21Institute of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland
22Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
23MPG Ranch, Missoula, MT, USA
24University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada
25IFEVA, Universidad de Buenos Aires, CONICET, Facultad de Agronomía, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina
26School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia
27Department of Ecology, Environment & Evolution, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
28Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
29Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
30Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, Community Ecology, Birmensdorf, Switzerland
31Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL, USA
325IFEVA, Universidad de Buenos Aires, CONICET, Facultad de Agronomía, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina
33Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota. St. Paul, MN,
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: embargoed
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2022030221469
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Publish Date: 2022-07-09
Description:

Abstract

The effects of altered nutrient supplies and herbivore density on species diversity vary with spatial scale, because coexistence mechanisms are scale dependent. This scale dependence may alter the shape of the species–area relationship (SAR), which can be described by changes in species richness (S) as a power function of the sample area (A): S = cAz, where c and z are constants. We analysed the effects of experimental manipulations of nutrient supply and herbivore density on species richness across a range of scales (0.01–75 m²) at 30 grasslands in 10 countries. We found that nutrient addition reduced the number of species that could co-occur locally, indicated by the SAR intercepts (log c), but did not affect the SAR slopes (z). As a result, proportional species loss due to nutrient enrichment was largely unchanged across sampling scales, whereas total species loss increased over threefold across our range of sampling scales.

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Series: Ecology letters
ISSN: 1461-023X
ISSN-E: 1461-0248
ISSN-L: 1461-023X
Volume: 24
Issue: 10
Pages: 2100 - 2112
DOI: 10.1111/ele.13838
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/ele.13838
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Subjects:
Funding: This work was generated using data from the Nutrient Network (http://www.nutnet.org) experiment, funded at the site scale by individual researchers. Coordination and data management have been supported by funding to E. Borer and E. Seabloom from the National Science Foundation Research Coordination Network (NSF-DEB-1042132) and Long Term Ecological Research (NSF-DEB-1234162 & DEB-1831944 to Cedar Creek LTER) programs and the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment (DG-0001-13).
Dataset Reference: Data are publicly available on the Environmental Data Initiative platform. https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/404d2e721eb71f15feb65491853d5d42.
  https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/404d2e721eb71f15feb65491853d5d42
Copyright information: © 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Seabloom, E.W., Batzer, E., Chase, J.M., Stanley Harpole, W., Adler, P.B., Bagchi, S., et al (2021) Species loss due to nutrient addition increases with spatial scale in global grasslands. Ecology Letters, 24, 2100– 2112, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13838. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.