University of Oulu

Brunila OP., Inkinen T., Kunnaala-Hyrkki V., Hämäläinen E., Ala-Rämi K. (2020) Black Carbon, Maritime Traffic and the Arctic. In: Pongrácz E., Pavlov V., Hänninen N. (eds) Arctic Marine Sustainability. Springer Polar Sciences. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28404-6_8

Black carbon, maritime traffic and the Arctic

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Author: Brunila, Olli-Pekka1; Inkinen, Tommi1; Hämäläinen, Esa1;
Organizations: 1University of Turku, Turku, Finland
2South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences, Mikkeli, Finland
3University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: open
Online Access: PDF Full Text (PDF, 0.3 MB)
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2022032324639
Language: English
Published: Springer Nature, 2020
Publish Date: 2022-03-23
Description:

Abstract

Maritime transportation covers approximately 90% of the global traffic volumes. The global fleet consists of approximately 100,000 diesel ships, around 250 LNG ships, and a smaller number of methanol or even electric ferries. When it comes to maritime transportation, the Arctic sea route is becoming more and more interesting for the shipping industry as it has been estimated that the Northeast Passage can shorten the travelling distance significantly compared to Suez Canal.

Black Carbon (BC) is the second largest contributor to climate change emissions after carbon dioxide (CO₂). BC particles spread out from different sources and the majority of BC emissions are transmitted to the Polar Regions from other parts of the globe. The share of global BC emission from international shipping is estimated to be up to 3% of the global total.

The Northern Sea Route can shorten the travelling distance, but it is important to find out, will the increase of maritime traffic effect the BC emissions in the Arctic. This paper considers how BC from ships’ fuel affects the Arctic. This paper also discusses alternative fuels and emission abatement technologies, which can decrease the emissions from ships and may also affect the BC emissions in the Arctic in the future.

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Series: Springer polar sciences
ISSN: 2510-0475
ISSN-L: 2510-0475
ISBN: 978-3-030-28404-6
ISBN Print: 978-3-030-28403-9
Pages: 165 - 177
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-28404-6_8
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28404-6_8
Host publication: Arctic marine sustainability : Arctic maritime businesses and the resilience of the marine environment
Host publication editor: Pongrácz, Eva
Pavlov, Victor
Hänninen, Niko
Type of Publication: A3 Book chapter
Field of Science: 1172 Environmental sciences
519 Social and economic geography
218 Environmental engineering
512 Business and management
Subjects:
Copyright information: © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Springer Polar Sciences. The final authenticated version is available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-28404-6_8.