University of Oulu

Ge, Y., García-Girón, J., Heino, J., Liu, Z., Zhang, C., Yan, Y., Xie, Z., & Li, Z. (2023). Dispersal syndromes mediate phylogenetic distance decay relationships in a dendritic stream network. Journal of Biogeography, 50, 897– 908. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14583

Dispersal syndromes mediate phylogenetic distance decay relationships in a dendritic stream network

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Author: Ge, Yihao1,2; García-Girón, Jorge3,4; Heino, Jani3;
Organizations: 1Collaborative Innovation Center of Recovery and Reconstruction of Degraded Ecosystem in Wanjiang Basin Co-Founded by Anhui Province and Ministry of Education, and School of Ecology and Environment, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu, China
2The Key Laboratory of Aquatic Biodiversity and Conservation, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China
3Geography Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
4Department of Biodiversity and Environmental Management, University of León, León, Spain
Format: article
Version: accepted version
Access: embargoed
Persistent link: http://urn.fi/urn:nbn:fi-fe2023031331335
Language: English
Published: John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Publish Date: 2024-03-06
Description:

Abstract

Aim: Understanding the mechanisms underlying the structure and connectivity of ecological communities is a central issue in biogeography. Dispersal syndromes are tightly woven into organisms’ life history seen across populations and communities, but measuring dispersal is still complicated in practice. We investigated the role of dispersal syndromes (here, associated with body size, adult flying ability and voltinism) to predict phylogenetic distance decay relationships (DDRs) of aquatic insect assemblages in dendritic stream networks.

Location: Du River Basin, China.

Taxon: Aquatic insects (Coleoptera, Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, Megaloptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera).

Methods: We applied multiple methods (i.e. deconstruction approach, null models, Mantel tests and partial Mantel tests) to enhance our basic understanding of phylogenetic distance decay patterns. To provide additional insights into correlates of phylogenetic dissimilarity between stream sites, we modelled potential dispersal routes based on overland, watercourse and cost distances.

Results: Overland distances were among the main correlates of phylogenetic distance decay in the stream networks studied, suggesting that aquatic insects disperse overland seeking for habitats suitable for survival and reproduction. However, local environmental filtering was generally more important for phylogenetic DDRs than geographical distances alone. The interaction between environmental vs. dispersal processes in driving spatial patterns of phylogenetic dissimilarity was contingent on different dispersal syndromes. More specifically, significant phylogenetic DDRs were detected only for subsets of large-bodied, univoltine taxa with strong adult flying abilities, such as dragonflies.

Main Conclusions: Overall, historical constraints affect the phylogenetic DDRs in aquatic insects. Dispersal syndromes associated with body size, adult flying ability and voltinism are key features underlying distance decay in phylogenetic assemblage similarity and the evolutionary legacies of aquatic insects in dendritic stream networks.

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Series: Journal of biogeography
ISSN: 0305-0270
ISSN-E: 1365-2699
ISSN-L: 0305-0270
Volume: 50
Issue: 5
Pages: 897 - 908
DOI: 10.1111/jbi.14583
OADOI: https://oadoi.org/10.1111/jbi.14583
Type of Publication: A1 Journal article – refereed
Field of Science: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1171 Geosciences
Subjects:
Funding: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 32271664, U22A20454, 31720103905), Project of Water Resources and Aquatic Biological Survey in The Shennongjia National Park, Biodiversity Survey, Monitoring and Assessment Project of the Department of Ecology and Environment of Hubei Province, China, and Science & Technology Fundamental Resources Investigation Program (grant no. 2022FY100400, 2019FY101903), Special Foundation for National Science and Technology Basic Research Program of China (2019FY101903), Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (grant no. KJ2021A0116), Project of Water Resources and Aquatic Biological Survey in The Shennongjia National Park and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 31720103905). ZL was supported by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2020M672447). JH and JGG were supported by the Academy of Finland (grant no. 331957).
Copyright information: © 2023 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ge, Y., García-Girón, J., Heino, J., Liu, Z., Zhang, C., Yan, Y., Xie, Z., & Li, Z. (2023). Dispersal syndromes mediate phylogenetic distance decay relationships in a dendritic stream network. Journal of Biogeography, 50, 897– 908 which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14583. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. This article may not be enhanced, enriched or otherwise transformed into a derivative work, without express permission from Wiley or by statutory rights under applicable legislation. Copyright notices must not be removed, obscured or modified. The article must be linked to Wiley’s version of record on Wiley Online Library and any embedding, framing or otherwise making available the article or pages thereof by third parties from platforms, services and websites other than Wiley Online Library must be prohibited.